I know we will get there.

[Interviewer]

How has Covid-19 impacted your daily life?

[Milsa]

Uh, well, now I work from home…and... I continue to work from home until...um I’m not really sure how long, But it’s been working pretty ok. I have two kids and so... as of March 15 they’ve been at home with me and doing the whole online, which has worked okay but they are really really excited to get back to school. Of course right away my kid’s um, sports were cancelled and everything kind of stopped. And so it’s been uh, I think the biggest adjustment is for me to ensure...you know...their happiness and everything like that. Um, that’s been the biggest thing, I’ve been lucky enough to retain a job along with my husband so we’ve been, I think,  one of the lucky ones in that.

So that’s the main thing

[Interviewer]

That must be hard.

[Milsa]

Yes

[Interviewer]

Having two kids at home...

[Milsa]

Yes. Yeah. 

But they’re good, they’re um, you know eleven and thirteen, so they’re not really really little, but yeah. One girl going to high school soon and so all those challenges for them, right?

[Interviewer]

Yeah.

[Milsa]

Yep.

[Interviewer]

What did you under-appreciate before Covid and what do you appreciate now?

[Milsa]

Oh, that’s a good question.

Um...I think, like a bit of the slowing down, like I... during the sports, like I really love going and watching them, but actually I really was... um just appreciating and enjoying, like, the rest more so I would say. Um...I didn’t re- like you do notice how busy you are, but then when you’re sitting down and then relaxing and being able to just do your own thing, like that was something nice to just kind of take a little bit of a break from all of the busyness.

[Interviewer]

Have everything like, slow you down. Let you take kind of a breather almost.

[Milsa]

Right, like we were busy with other things it seemed, I never was at a point with “I don’t know what to do”, but it was nice to just have a break from the whole- the other stuff too.

[Interviewer]

Yeah

[Milsa]

Mhm

[Interviewer]

How will the pandemic change society once it’s over, like how do you think?

[Milsa]

Uhm, well... I- I’m concerned because just economically and everything that it has been affected with business and all of that... um... that’s going to be like a long-term effect. And I do, I think like- what was the question? Like what was going to be the biggest impact? Or the biggest concern?

[Interviewer]

Yeah, like what do you- how do you think the pandemic will change society once it’s over?

[Milsa]

Society?

Um... I’m hoping people will... will notice some of the different things that they might have been missing, like the “taking the break” and maybe more exercise and maybe more just like... being. I hope that that will affect it, I don’t know if it will like long term.

 Um, yeah just economically it’ll... it’ll take a number of years and it will effect that way for sure.

[Interviewer]

How does isolation affect you and how has it impacted your relationship with family and friends?

[Milsa]

Um...

It was hard at times, I think you do adjust pretty quickly and you find just new ways to communicate with people. I still think we are very very lucky, we can um... speak with people like at a distance and we are not completely isolated in our homes. Um I never did have to go through, you know, a quarantine or anything and I can’t imagine how that would have been. 

Um, so yeah emotionally it’s- it’s not- it's been a little bit of a struggle, but not- not too great.

[Interviewer]

Not to the point where it’s like... desolating.

[Milsa]

No. No.

[Interviewer] 

What pre-Covid memory keeps you hopeful and what possible future keeps you going?

[Milsa]

What pre-Covid...

[Interviewer]

Memory.

[Milsa]

Memory makes me hopeful... oh.

*laughing*

That’s a good one. That’s a good question.

Um...

[Interviewer]

Like is it- remember like, going out to family gatherings and...

[Milsa]

Yeah, um absolutely there are- for me I- like, I know I have a grandma that is- I have two grandmas that are in, um, community- um like they are in a home and I have not yet been able to see them yet. So I am very very hopeful that I can see them again sooner than later. Um that’s... but that’s more of a sad- what was the other question the sad moment?

[Interviewer]

Like what pre-covid memory keeps you hopeful and what possible future keeps you going. So that could be- that’s definitely a possible future that keeps you going.

[Milsa]

Yeah for sure.

Um, and what keeps me going is- with the schools being able to go back, um like the children being able to go back, that I’m hopeful that they can have a good year and, um,  just kind of learn... learn from this too.

But yeah the memories is just being able to see family and friends like I used to be able to- and I know we will get there.

[Interviewer]

Yea