My hope is we will be more compassionate, more appreciative of essential workers for example.

[Interviewer]:

Okay, first question. How has COVID-19 impacted your daily life?

[Kim]

My daily life... I've been here so much so my work life has definitely been extended by that. We're very blessed to have incredible staff here that are here for the right reasons. They're here to ensure that COVID does not walk through that door, knock on wood, and to keep all the residents safe and their families as well, now that they're allowed onsite. Even though we've added positions, that still takes more work, and with every new order we receive it's modified somewhat, but sometimes there's more that's added to it. Definitely the amount of time that I've had for myself has not necessarily been there. But that's okay. I'm okay with it. Let's walk through this and get through this safely and it's all good.

 [Interviewer]:

Yeah, no problem. Okay. What did you take for granted before COVID that you appreciate more now?

[Kim]

Oh, definitely freedom, being able to, without even thinking about it without a second guess, just going anywhere and doing anything. Because I work here, definitely I think about even going to the grocery store. Initially when this first started and it was all about being safe and having a big container of hand sanitizer in my purse and making sure I have my masks on before it was mandatory. I definitely didn't want to bring. Before you just walked into a grocery store, you didn't give anything a second thought. You're thinking about all the steps you need to take to ensure wherever you are and wherever you're going is safe. Definitely not being around a great many people. I haven't seen most of my family and friends since this has started.

[Interviewer]:

Yeah, yeah. How do you think the pandemic will change society once it's over?

[Kim]

My hope is we will be more compassionate, more appreciative of essential workers for example. Watching the video that the mayor's COVID team had made for the first time was just so overwhelming and how important people like that are to keep us going to keep us living. More understanding, my hope is that we're going to balance things out and people are going to see what's really the wants and needs, what's really important.

[Interviewer]:

Okay. How did isolation affect you and how has it affected your relationships with family and friends?

[Kim]

Most of them, my family and friends, I haven't seen since it started, as I said. How has it affected me? I guess, because we live in an environment, especially through flu season where outbreaks and isolation happen, pre COVID, even in an influenza outbreak, we are still staff. I'm still careful about where I'm going and what I'm doing to, once again, keep these guys safe. The fact is though that this is much longer. A normal isolation where you're doing all of that is usually a month max at any time, here anyway, that we've had. Whereas COVID, we're going to see this go into next year. Right now I'm good, but who knows. Christmas, we'll see what Christmas looks like for everybody here and for family and all of that. It all depends on the community, what's going on out there right now. Like the Chief Medical Officer said, it's all in our hands. Make the right choices now.

[Interviewer]:

Last question, what memories keep you hopeful and what possible future keeps you going?

[Kim]

I did an article in the Babbling Brook newsletter about the 1918 flu. That was a worldwide pandemic. The loss of life was so great. Healthcare was limited for them at that point in time. Communication, the way we have to communicate with the world today versus what they had in 1918. They still made it through. Life went on after the fact. Yes, it went on for a little over a year, I think almost a year and a half. That is my hope. Going through the research of all of that and seeing that you know what, we're going to be okay. We'll get through this together if we're all working together to keep one another safe. Being considerate of others, definitely washing your hands and covering your cough is something we learned as children. I don't know why some stopped doing that. That's again, being considered of one another, anywhere at anytime.

[Interviewer]:

Yes, all right, awesome. Thank you so much for answering these questions.

[Kim]

You're very welcome.