I was raised out near Drayton Valley in the Dirty 30s, and I know what isolation is.

[Interviewer]

How has COVID-19 impacted your daily life?

[Kim (staff)]

Did you hear that?

[Kay]

No.

[Kim (staff)]

How has COVID-19 impacted your daily life?

[Kay]

Well, I don't see my family as often as I would, and we don't have as many... we don't have as much... I always come to the music-

[Kim (staff)]

The live music. Yes.

[Kay]

And we don't have as many entertainers coming in.

[Kim (staff)]

Because they can't come in. Yeah. Yeah.

[Interviewer]

What did you take for granted before COVID that you appreciate more now?

[Kay]

Well, I guess the fact that our freedom, the freedom to come and go whenever you want to.

[Interviewer]

How do you think the pandemic will change society once it's over?

[Kay]

I think people might be more sociable. I don't know. We haven't been able to be very sociable. We're not allowed to speak, and we have to stay at a distance, and we're not allowed to speak to one another the same as we used to.

[Kim (staff)]

Really close together and stuff because of social distancing. Yeah.

[Kay]

Yeah.

[Interviewer]

How did isolation affect you, and how has this affected your relationships with family and friends?

[Kay]

Well, I have been alone now. I was alone for 20 years before I came in here because my second husband passed away. So, I know what it's like to be isolated, and I was raised out near Drayton Valley in the Dirty 30s, and I know what isolation is. We couldn't go because it had a case of not being able to afford it and not having a means to do... You know, it was an isolated place, and there was no railroad. There was no paved roads out there. We walked, basically. I have walked twice from Entwistle to my home in Rocky Rapids which was four miles from Drayton Valley. 22 miles to get home at Easter time when the roads were all nothing but mud.

[Kim (staff)]

Now that's isolation.

[Interviewer]

Yeah.

[Kay]

Yeah.

[Interviewer]

Okay. And last question. What memories keep you hopeful and what possible future keeps you going?

[Kay]

Well, I don't plan to be here that long. When you get to be 93 years old, you could go any time, and so there's not much for us to be hopeful for. I was so used to working all the time. We feel so useless, but I'm hoping that people are being more courteous and friendly after this and appreciate it more. I don't know. And I certainly hope the kids can stay in school. I have 21 great grandchildren, and I worry about them.

[Kim (staff)]

And Kay actually used to be a teacher.

[Kay]

Yeah.

[Interviewer]

Wow.

[Kay]

Yeah.

[Jason]

We're in a school right now.

[Kay]

So, I've lived with a lot of people, and I've been alone a lot too.

[Kim (staff)]

Yeah.

[Kay]

I would recommend to anybody, I make my life interested by reading, and I would advise that to anybody to keep reading as long as you can.

[Kim (staff)]

Because you read the entire Journal front to back every day.

[Kay]

Well, not-

[Kim (staff)]

Not the cartoons?

[Kay]

Just the one that ...

[Kim (staff)]

Yeah.

[Kay]

I have a book here from my brother. My brother wrote this book of poems, and there's a book that's about Ireland about the Dirty 30s.

[Kim (staff)]

Oh really? Can I borrow this book?

[Kay]

Yeah.

[Kim (staff)]

Okay, good. Perfect. Because I'm going to put a few in the newsletter then. Perfect. Okay.