I don't think the world will ever be the same again, to be honest. And I kind of feel sad for that.

[Interviewer]

Question one, how has COVID-19 impacted your daily life?

[Joni]

Well, I have two children so it has really impacted my daily life because... Well, for my kids especially, last year they had to leave school. So I had to teach them at home, but I was going through a very hard medical issue so I wasn't able to teach my youngest son, who was six. He's very much behind in school right now, because I was bedridden and I wasn't able to teach him on the computer and keep up with his studies. So that's very much affected him. And so, we are currently trying to catch up with all of that right now. His teachers have been a great help. And I'm better, and my husband's doing the best he can. The reason why my husband wasn't around is because we own a business, Codfather Seafood, and so he was very busy with that.

With my daughter, she was going to Victoria School of Arts, and she just had moved in with us when COVID had started. So, when I was driving her back and forth, during the winter times, it got very hard because my car wouldn't start in the morning when it got very cold in January. And also, it was just hard, I had to buy her two bus passes for her to catch the bus. I had drop her off in Spruce, she had to catch a Spruce bus pass and an Edmonton bus pass, it was very hard to afford. So, I tried to transfer her into here. And transferring into here, she couldn't go to the public school, she had to go to, what is called?

[Interviewer]

Like Outreach?

[Joni]

Outreach. Yes. Outreach. And so with Outreach, that was hard enough on its own because she was kind of learning at home. But when COVID started, it was very hard because she didn't have no access from teachers and she learns differently, she learns in class. So, she's behind now and she's doing grade 10, she's doing grade 10 work, which she's supposed to be in grade 11. And because she's doing great 10 work that affected her from getting into high school this year, because they were full in the high school, they couldn't take her. Which was very unfortunate, and I'm very sad about that. She's very depressed about it and stuff.

And it's touchy because I don't know if she's going to be behind more again now, but she's really, really trying and I'll get her a tutor if I have to pay for it, whatever it takes, I will do that. So COVID has... And then plus, our restaurant, it affected our restaurant as well as everybody else's business. Yeah, it's really affected us. Yeah.

[Interviewer]

Thank you. Next question. What did you under appreciate before? COVID that you appreciate more now?

[Joni]

Under appreciate before COVID? Honestly, just being free to walk around without a mask. Just getting in line without... And sneezing even without being looked at like, "Oh my god, does she have COVID?" Just the little things. Just going to a restaurant and being... What I really appreciated was just the contact with people and family members, that just being able to communicate more. I don't know, just that kind of stuff. Just the freedom.

[Interviewer]

Yeah.

[Joni]

Pretty much.

[Interviewer]

How do you think the pandemic will change society once it's all over?

[Joni]

Well, I think the pandemic has already changed society, already. Especially since, even before the pandemic, the kids were always in the house online, but especially more now, they're not getting out associating, they're always looking down... Yeah, just the association and then plus, not so much in Canada, it's kind of... But in the States, it's just getting very, I think, ugly. To put... I'm trying to be politically correct.

[Interviewer]

No, it's okay.

[Joni]

It's just getting very... I don't know. I just don't know what-

[Interviewer]

A lot of civil unrest.

[Joni]

Yeah. I don't think the world will ever be the same again, to be honest. And I kind of feel sad for that. I kind of feel sad for that.

[Interviewer]

Thank you.

[Joni]

I'm praying but, hopefully.

[Interviewer]

Yeah. How did isolation affect you and how has it impacted your relationships with your friends and family?

[Joni]

So my son has severe ADHD and defiant disorder. So, when we were in... He's been in a program, in school program, FCSS I believe it's called, since he's been three, dealing with the school. So, when the pandemic hit... Yeah, FCSS. When the pandemic hit, we were always inside. I tried to get them to walk around and stuff like that but... So he has severe ADHD, so he's super hyper. And he has behavioral issues. So when the pandemic hit, it was a lot. It took a big toll on him.

And we had gotten the cops called on us a couple of times just by people thinking that something was going on and I had to explain to them, "No, that's not it. I'm giving him his medication and he's calming down but... It takes a little while." I wish people would've had a little bit more patience because when they bang on the roof or when they scream, he reacts to that. And he goes off more. I try to explain, but it was difficult, but I have been dealing with it for a while so I am more patient. I know. But it's hard. Sorry, what was the question?

[Interviewer]

Oh, no, that was-

[Joni]

That was good?

[Interviewer]

... a really good answer. But yeah, it was just-

[Joni]

It was pretty hard-

[Interviewer]

... how did it impact you?

[Joni]

... and then with my daughter too. With my daughter too, the pandemic really affected her, especially it came at a time where she was transitioning from moving in with me from her father. And she was having depression issues. I couldn't get her a counselor. I still haven't gotten her a counselor. So it's still affecting her. But we're working at it. I'm praying with them and just trying to keep strong. Yeah.

[Interviewer]

Yeah. I have one more question for you.

[Joni]

Okay.

[Interviewer]

What pre COVID memory keeps you hopeful and what possible future keeps you going?

[Joni]

Pre COVID memory... So, pre COVID memory. What pre covenant memory keeps me hopeful?

[Interviewer]

Yeah. What's something that you're holding onto?

[Joni]

Holding onto. Okay. Pre COVID memory that keeps me hopeful. Just being able to travel, being able to just walk around freely, being able to walk into a place without people staring at you, getting judged if you were wearing a mask, or if you are not wearing a mask. Just the friendliness. Just be the way people use to be towards each other before the pandemic hit, that keeps me hopeful.

[Interviewer]

Thank you so much.

[Joni]

And then, what was the last question?

[Interviewer]

It was just what possible idea of the future keeps you going?

[Joni]

What possible idea? Sorry, I couldn't…

[Interviewer]

That's okay. What possible future ideas that you have about it, keep you going, keep you motivated?

[Joni]

Keep me going? What keeps me uplifted, honestly, right now, is just my faith. My faith in God, basically. My faith in God and my faith that this is all happening, but the world is soon to come to a change and come to a peaceful... I know it's all happening for a reason. Yeah.

[Interviewer]

Thank you so much.

[Joni]

All right.

[Joni]

Thank you.

[Interviewer]

Yeah, thank you...