I think it's really showing some ugly truths about our society.

[Interviewer]

How has COVID-19 impacted your daily life?

[John]

I work at a rehabilitation facility which, because of COVID-19, has had to be closed down. So, I work from home, daily, and it's been a struggle in that there's very little separation between home and work. So, that's the major impact.

[Interviewer]

What did you under appreciate before COVID that you appreciate more now?

[John]

Contact with coworkers. Daily getting up to be able to walk over to someone's office to talk. Being freely able, with my partner, to go out and spontaneously go to a restaurant or go shopping. Those are probably the major points.

[Interviewer]

How will the pandemic change society once it's over?

[John]

I think we have to be far more aware of our impact in our proximity to other people. Consideration. I think it's really showing some ugly truths about our society, about how people feel that their rights supersede those of others, which I think is a big mistake. I think we have to be far more understanding and open to being more considerate of others.

[Interviewer]

How did isolation affect you, and how has this impacted your relationships with family and friends?

[John]

Well, fortunately I have a wonderful partner who we share our living space. But, I found that there was a period of time where I was struggling with depression, just because I was not getting out. I had not prepared myself for the separation between work and being at home. And so, what I have had to do is just initially force myself to be more active. Get out and walk as much as possible. I don't cycle as much as I did, but just get out, even though I'm on my own, but get outside and not stick around the house, and watch TV, and feel sorry for myself, I guess.

[Interviewer]

What pre-COVID memory keeps you hopeful, and what possible future keeps you going?

[John]

That's a good question. That's a tougher one. I guess pre-COVID would be the hope that we will be able to have some semblance of normalcy where we can get out and be more spontaneous going to events like this. But also, being aware of the impact that we can have on other people. I'm from Edmonton, so masks are mandatory in indoor spaces. So, I've carried one with me, and it's not a big deal. It's easy to put it on, take it off.

I think that it's a difficult time right now that we're still adjusting to this reality, because we don't really know what will happen. Are we in the first wave, the second wave, the third wave? What will happen with return to school, which I think in September is going to be a real watershed moment, because it's going to affect a number of things. Businesses being able to operate because whether or not kids will be able to remain in school safely. How's that going to affect their parents, their ability to work? I think that's it.

[Interviewer]

That's it.

[John]

That's it. Hey.

[Interviewer]

Thank you very much for being a part of our project.

[John]

You're welcome.