I also really began to notice within myself and with others the impact of uncertainty.

[Interviewer]

Awesome. Okay. Question number one... Just a second. Okay, how has COVID-19 impacted your daily life?

[Dianne]

So initially the impact was really felt in my work environment and that's because we became really focused on moving education from our schools into our homes, which is something, of course, we had never experienced or encountered before. But then once we got settled there and as time passed, I felt the impacts more emotionally. And I started to experience a sense of loss, a loss of contact with friends, family, some of the social activities that I looked forward to and welcomed, and then really a loss of familiar ways of working.

So the way we would gather for meetings, the way that I'd connect with people over coffee, some professional development, where we would invite people to come early, network, grab a coffee before we started. Those things I really started to miss. And then I also really began to notice within myself and with others the impact of uncertainty and the lack of predictability every single day. You would go through, here's the guidelines, this is the things that we're going to do, and then you get your head around that and then you show up the next day and it would be different. And so things changed.

[Interviewer]

Yes.

[Dianne]

And that really dysregulated because with the lack of predictability in our certainty, it was really hard to feel like you could anticipate or prepare for what was to come. So not knowing what tomorrow was going to look like or feel like makes feeling hopeful really difficult. And feeling hopeful makes the human condition strong and our strength and our ability to sit in community and our sense of worth and value is really being threatened, I think. And I think we're vulnerable. So the impact is huge.

[Interviewer]

Awesome. Thank you.

[Dianne]

You're welcome.

[Interviewer]

Okay. Question two. What did you underappreciate before COVID that you appreciate more now?

[Dianne]

And this really made me think, so thank you for the question. But what I've come up with is I think prior to COVID I experienced that we were all so busy doing stuff and jumping from one thing to another, jumping from here to there, that we really weren't taking the time to be. And what I mean by that is to be present and to really notice those things that you have the opportunity to notice.

I saw more folks outside going for walks, accessing the parks, playing with their children, baking. I know baking, because I tried to find yeast for about two months. Couldn't find any yeast. Doing puzzles, things like that.

[Interviewer]

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

[Dianne]

And as a result of COVID, I think we were spending more time with our immediate families and we were exploring and pursuing interests that prior to COVID, we didn't seem to have the time for.

[Interviewer]

All right, awesome. I love that answer. Number three. How do you think the pandemic will change society once it's over?

[Dianne]

Truly, I think COVID will have an impact on society in two pretty significant areas. The first one is how we work, how we will be showing up as community or within community. That I think we are more and more each day are really gaining an appreciation of taking care of one another of sharing, particularly sharing with those less fortunate than ourselves.

And the second thing is I think that we're going to wake up and start paying attention to our planet and the care of our planet. I think research is surfacing right now, connecting the pandemic to the lack of health of our planet. And I think that as this progresses, our society is going to become hypervigilant on our food sources, our air and water quality.

[Interviewer]

Awesome, fourth question. How did isolation affect you and how has it impacted your relationships with family and friends?

[Dianne]

I think it's impacted me in a positive way because I've spent more time with my loved ones than I've ever before. We've done things together that we haven't done before. We've established new routines and I've really enjoyed that shift. Connection to my friends and colleagues has become really important. So COVID is showing me, I think, genuine, authentic ways of connecting that are really coming from the heart and not so much just from the head, like our rush to do something, buy something for somebody, rather than actually be there for somebody. So that's been really, really rewarding.

And I think the downside and the negative side is the toll that it's taking in terms of emotional health and wellbeing. Walking around, carrying the anxiety of the uncertainties-

[Interviewer]

Yeah.

[Dianne]

...trying to figure out what tomorrow looks like, what our future looks like. Stability within the economy, all of those kinds of things I think they're wearing. And I think that in a position where it continues for a long period of time, there's long-term unintended consequences that we haven't even realized yet.

[Interviewer]

Yeah. Okay, last question. What pre-COVID memory keeps you hopeful and what possible future keeps you going?

[Dianne]

Okay. So this question was a hard question for me, as I thought about it, because my lived experience was filled with challenges as a result of two sons that I had with significant challenges. But thinking that through, I learned that approaching adversity and with my two boys, there was tons of adversity, but approaching adversity with an attitude of exploring opportunity and possibility was really, really helpful. It normalized the situation and we became stronger because of it. And that keeps me hopeful because COVID has created adversity in our lives. And conversations, therefore about possibility and opportunity because of COVID, certainly keeps hope alive.

[Interviewer]

All right, awesome. Thank you very much. That is all.