We came here just for a year to experience Canada and all of the sudden it’s been totally changed.

[Interviewer]

How has Covid-19 impacted your daily life?

[Charlie]

Hmm… quite substantially I think. yes.

[Interviewer]

So a lot of things have changed?

[Charlie]

Uh… mainly emotionally. Yeah just having...

[Interviewer]

Keeping your distance from people...

[Charlie]

Yes keeping your distance, the social iso… isolation, but we came here just for a year to experience Canada and all of the sudden it’s been totally changed.

*laughing* 

Yes

[Interviewer]

What did you under-appreciate before Covid-19 and what do you appreciate now?

[Charlie]

Freedoms. The freedoms we had. Yeah… I just- Yeah I didn’t expect it to be all taken away so quickly.

[Interviewer]

Yeah having it all ripped away from you must be pretty jarring.

[Charlie]

Yes 

*laughing*

[Interviewer]

Especially if you are new to- especially if you’re new to Canada.

[Charlie]

Yeah! Yeah, well you come here and you think “right I’m going to get involved in everything” , but I really wanted to get involved with the museums and seeing what was going on and I had a job lined up and it all  just… just went. So it just turned everything upside down.

[Interviewer]

How did isolation affect you and how has it affected your relationships with family?

[Charlie]

Isolation!

*sigh*

Very difficult, isolation cause I’m very social.  um… and you feel like you just want to escape all the time and just watch T.V. or like... we haven’t got. So just youtubes or… or  go on Netflix and that, Which is really something I really don’t like doing. Or then you just spend your time reading. And  as far as family I think it’s brought our family together, but only in the way that we see each others flaws and have to ask for forgiveness and start again and um… that sort of thing. So it’s more...

[Interviewer]

Kind of forced to be more close to each other.

[Charlie]

Well… in... in a way, but it’s also exposed each other's weaknesses and that we can love each other through it, has brought us all probably closer together. So this time isn’t going to be too drastic.

[Interviewer]

How do you think the pandemic will change society once it’s over?

[Charlie]

I don’t know… I… I think it’s split society. It’s shown those people that really follow and- the guidelines and everything and other people that think “oh this is a load of rubbish” and so… I think the media’s had um… a lot to answer for because it’s… it’s splitting the society and… and now I think that might make people more aware how we can go down the wrong track pretty quickly and how demo- we can’t take democracy for um...granted because by the look of it, it’s been taken away from us anyway. 

*laughing*

So it’s... yeah… I- I think it’s going to make people more aware, but I don’t know how it’s going to get back to normal.

[Interviewer]

Last question: What pre-Covid memory keeps you hopeful and what possible future keeps you going?

[Charlie]

What pre- well I’m a christian, and so I really know that it’s all going to be ok in the end for myself and my family and whatever happens we will have that inner strength. Um… and I know I’ve- I’ve loved my- the time in Canada and so even though this has been really awkward I will have the memories of Canada now and the beautiful things I’ve seen. 

Um… pre-Covid memories… well funny because pre-Covid I was back at home.

*laughing*

And so that- so it’s... It’s a difficult situation really, that question because I’ve only known Canada sort of, almost, since it’s been in Covid and my pre-Covid memories would be back at home anyway. Which I’m glad I’m not there because back in New Zealand and Australia it’s pretty… awful.

*laughing*

So I’m certainly grateful that my memories of Covid would be travelling in Canada as- basically in isolation. Which was fantastic because we got to Banff and that sort of place and we had the whole place to ourself. So… so I think that was- that was really good.